A Guide to Rocks in the Aquarium - Page 2 - GTA Aquaria Forum - Aquarium Fish & Plants serving the Greater Toronto Area.
GTA Aquaria Forum - Aquarium Fish & Plants serving the Greater Toronto Area.

Go Back   GTA Aquaria Forum - Aquarium Fish & Plants serving the Greater Toronto Area. > FRESHWATER > General Freshwater Discussion
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Advertise Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Advertise

General Freshwater Discussion For all topics relating to freshwater fish to the in's and out's of maintaining a freshwater tank.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 02-03-2011, 10:10 PM   #11
Jamblor
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Mississauga
Posts: 135
Feedback Score: (9)
Jamblor is on a distinguished road
Default

"Lava rock" is a rock. It is a form of igneous rock under the subcategory of pyroclastic debris. However the above picture isn't pumice.(unless it floats) Lava rock is the generic term for scoria. Scoria and pumice look very similar but scoria will have a density greater than 1 g/cm^3 while pumice is less than 1.

Both rocks form the same way. Ejected magma rapidly cools, depressurizes and degasses forming the bubbles. Also the reddish colour will typically come from oxidation of iron bearing minerals in the magma.

Rocks are fun
__________________
___________
Thanks,
-Victor

A Guide To Rocks in the Aquarium
Jamblor is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 02-04-2011, 09:52 AM   #12
impalass
Up-and-comer
 
impalass's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Toronto Canada
Posts: 54
Feedback Score: (0)
impalass is on a distinguished road
Default

Excellent post, thank you for sharing.
impalass is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2011, 02:25 PM   #13
Jackson
JAX
 
Jackson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: North York
Posts: 2,949
Feedback Score: (54)
Jackson is a splendid one to behold Jackson is a splendid one to behold
Default

What does lava rock do to ph? Will it raise it or not?

This is a great thread thanks for creating it.
Jackson is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Old 02-04-2011, 03:44 PM   #14
Greg_o
Devoted Member
 
Greg_o's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Brampton
Posts: 1,098
Feedback Score: (122)
Greg_o is a jewel in the rough
Default

This is great, thanks.

We have so many eperts here, and we now have a resident rock expert!
Greg_o is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2011, 04:24 PM   #15
Jamblor
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Mississauga
Posts: 135
Feedback Score: (9)
Jamblor is on a distinguished road
Default

Well if it is natural lava rock(scoria) to my knowledge it shouldn't do anything to pH. I don't believe water has enough acidic/basic properties to actually dissolve the minerals in a scoria.
__________________
___________
Thanks,
-Victor

A Guide To Rocks in the Aquarium
Jamblor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2011, 04:57 PM   #16
Jamblor
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Mississauga
Posts: 135
Feedback Score: (9)
Jamblor is on a distinguished road
Default

Rocks in the GTA

This post and successive posts will outline the specific types or rocks you are likely to find in and around the GTA.

Unfortunately, the native country rock that we sit on are Palaeozoic sedimentary rocks. I say unfortunately because sedimentary rocks are the type of rock that, over time, will affect your water parameters.

Below is a section of a geological map for the GTA. The different colours represent the contact between different rock formations.


East of Toronto, the green colour is the Ordovician(~500-435 million years ago) Whitby Formation which consists of different coloured shales.
Toronto is right in the middle of Ordivician Georgian Bay formation. It consists of shales, limestones, dolostones.
Westward to Mississauga. The grey colour is the Ordovician Queenston Formation, consisting of a red shale and some limestone.
Further west towards the Niagara Escarpment we encounter the Silurian age(435-412MYA) Cabot Head, Manitoulin, and Whirlpool Formations. All consist of different coloured shales, limestones, and sandstones.
The orange colour, is the cap rock of the escarpment and is the Silurian Lockport & Amabel Formation which consists of grey and brown dolostone.

In this part of Ontario, the further West you go, the younger the rock formation.

So what does this all mean. It means that the majority of native rock you see in the GTA will be either a dolostone/limestone, a shale, or a sandstone. None of which are particularly desirable in an aquarium unless you don't mind the gradual increase in water hardness and alkalinity.

BUT! it's not all bad news. If any of you travel North in the summer to a cottage that is in the Muskoka region. You have entered Precambrian(500-1000+MYA) rocks. The dominant rock there is Gneiss. Gneiss as mentioned early is a metamorphic rock. And possibly some granitic intrusions here and there.

AND! more good news. Thanks to glaciers in the last ice age, rocks from the North have hitched a ride and been deposited into the country rock and sediments of the GTA. That is why occasionally you will see granitic or gneiss type rocks kind of randomly appearing with the younger sedimentary rocks of the GTA. You can find these pretty much anywhere but you likely have to dig. The alternative is scouring the shoreline of Lake Ontario. Many of the cobble beaches in the GTA have abundant weathered cobbles of pink granite and gneiss. I would post examples but unfortunately my girlfriends backyard(my favourite rock place in the GTA lol) is encased in ice. But as soon as I can get some I'll post pictures of the examples.
__________________
___________
Thanks,
-Victor

A Guide To Rocks in the Aquarium
Jamblor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2011, 05:12 PM   #17
Jamblor
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Mississauga
Posts: 135
Feedback Score: (9)
Jamblor is on a distinguished road
Default

Ok so I found some examples in the Geology Lab.
Sorry for the low quality pictures they are on my cell phone.


This is a grey shale. It is likely to not affect water parameters, however it is a relatively soft rock and may deteriorate over time.


An example of a Pink Granite. You will likely encounter this in a more smoothed and weathered version. Aquarium safe, very inert.


A banded gneiss. A metamorphic rock that is safe and inert. I think they look pretty neat. Again, you will likely find a rounded, weathered version unless you head up North.

These are a few examples I'll post more when I can locate some.
__________________
___________
Thanks,
-Victor

A Guide To Rocks in the Aquarium
Jamblor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2011, 05:14 PM   #18
dspin02
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Toronto
Posts: 89
Feedback Score: (5)
dspin02 is on a distinguished road
Default

this is great information, thanks a bunch. im up in the muskoka area a few times every summer, next time ill look for some cool rocks for my next tank.

if it hasn't been already, i think this should be stickied.
__________________
-Andrew
dspin02 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2011, 05:18 PM   #19
Jamblor
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Mississauga
Posts: 135
Feedback Score: (9)
Jamblor is on a distinguished road
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dspin02 View Post
this is great information, thanks a bunch. im up in the muskoka area a few times every summer, next time ill look for some cool rocks for my next tank.

if it hasn't been already, i think this should be stickied.
No problem I get a lot of info from this community so this is my way of contributing.

And how do I get this stickied? Does an admin do it?
__________________
___________
Thanks,
-Victor

A Guide To Rocks in the Aquarium
Jamblor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2011, 05:21 PM   #20
dspin02
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Toronto
Posts: 89
Feedback Score: (5)
dspin02 is on a distinguished road
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamblor View Post
No problem I get a lot of info from this community so this is my way of contributing.

And how do I get this stickied? Does an admin do it?
An we thank you for it, still looking for a way i can contribute, maybe sometime down the line.

and yeah, i believe admin/moderator's are the only ones who can sticky threads. im sure one of them will soon, this is a really good piece, people are always asking/wondering if rocks are safe or not, now we have a guide to refer to.
__________________
-Andrew
dspin02 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:15 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.